Webinar: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and the mental health of children and adolescents in Ontario

Public Health Ontario presents "Mostly worse, occasionally better: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and the mental health of children and adolescents in Ontario". 

Public health (or emergency) measures implemented to mitigate COVID-19 may have unintended consequences on the mental health of children and youth. This large cross-sectional cohort study examined the impact of COVID-19 emergency measures on child/adolescent mental health for children/adolescents with and without pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses. Greater stress from social isolation was associated with deterioration in all mental health domains. Enhancing social interactions for children/adolescents will be an important mitigation strategy for current and future COVID-19 waves.

Date: Tuesday December 8, 2020

Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM EST

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By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. identify the impacts of public health measures on child and youth mental health in a global context
  2. compare the rates of deterioration and improvement in child and youth mental health in Ontario during the first wave of the pandemic and before the pandemic 
  3. identify the variables associated with deterioration and improvement in child and youth mental health in Ontario during the first wave of the pandemic
  4. discuss ideas for improving child and youth mental health during subsequent waves of the pandemic.

About the presenter: Katherine Tombeau

Katherine Tombeau Cost, Ph.D. is a research assoiciate in the Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health in the Research Insititue at the Hospital for Sick Children. During her PhD in New Orleans, she worked with rats, studying cognition in pregnancy and motherhood. Accepting a postdoc position in Toronto, she worked on the Maternal Adversity and Neurodevelopment (MAVAN) project, studying maternal cognition and maternal behaviour in humans. Katherine applies innovative statistical methods to understand the differential contributions of biological, psychological, and sociological variables to parent and child mental health

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