Reasons for driving under the influence of cannabis according to drivers in a remedial program

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This evidence brief summarizes the evidence on the reasons for driving under the influence of cannabis according to drivers in a remedial program. The brief was developed by the Evidence Exchange Network in 2019. 

What you need to know:

The majority of people who participated in a remedial program said they felt only slightly high after using cannabis and believed that cannabis did not affect their ability to drive. Some said they drove high to prevent someone else from drinking and driving and/or to save cost and time. About half of the participants said they used a variety of techniques to compensate for the effects of cannabis, such as, eating food or waiting 30 minutes before driving. By looking at qualitative data from people who often engage in DUIC, the researchers were able to understand key reasons behind driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC) and describe common features of such experiences.